Vietnam's sovereignty over Paracel and Spratly Islands

QNN |

(QNO) - 34 old maps proving that China has never had any sovereignty over Paracel and Spratly Islands have recently been sent to Vietnam from Connecticut (USA) by Tran Thang, an engineer working for Pratt & Whitney- an American aerospace manufacturer and President of the New York-based Institute for Vietnamese Culture and Education.

Tran Thang and the old atlas without China’s sovereignty over Paracel and Spratly Islands.
Tran Thang and the old atlas without China’s sovereignty over Paracel and Spratly Islands.
 

In 2012, Mr. Thang sent to Da Nang city more than 100 old maps and 3 old atlases of the East Sea, China and Maritime Southeast Asia proving that Paracel and Spratly Islands never belong to China. All the maps are exclusive. 70 of them are maps of China where the southernmost point of Chinese territory is identified at Hai Nam Island. On 15 others, Paracel and Spratly Islands are drawn close to Vietnam (A question is why these islands are not put near any country such as Korea, China, Singapore, the Philippines, or Brunei but near Vietnam). The last ones are of Asia and Southeast Asia where Paracel and Spratly Islands are shown to belong to Vietnam.

These maps and atlases have very high legal and historical status. They are now exhibited at the museums and exhibition halls in Da Nang city.

Vintage China Orient Map (1626).
Vintage China Orient Map (1626).
 
Map of Asia by Willem Bluaeu, Amsterdam, Holland (1618).
Map of Asia by Willem Bluaeu, Amsterdam, Holland (1618).
 
Paracels belongs to Vietnam.
Paracels belongs to Vietnam.
 
China on the World map by Jacob Van Meurs, Dutch (1665).
China on the World map by Jacob Van Meurs, Dutch (1665).
 
 
 
 
Vietnam’s Paracel (Hoàng Sa) on the map of Indes Orientale by Pierre Duval, Paris, French (1677).
Vietnam’s Paracel (Hoàng Sa) on the map of Indes Orientale by Pierre Duval, Paris, French (1677).
 
Map of China by Herman Moll, London, England (1723).
Map of China by Herman Moll, London, England (1723).
 

Professor Carl Thayer, an expert on the East Sea at the University of New South Wales (Australia) said that the maps collected by Tran Thang show the contradictions in China’s statement about its sovereignty over the two disputed islands. Three atlases also demonstrate that China has never had any sovereignty over Paracels and Spratly Islands. These atlases are also in Da Nang city now.

 
 
 
Atlas of the Chinese Empire, 1908 (35cm x 24cm), including 23 maps.
Atlas of the Chinese Empire, 1908 (35cm x 24cm), including 23 maps.
 
 
 
 
China’s postal atlas by the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of China, 1919 (62cm x 38cm), including 29 maps described in 3 languages: Chinese, English and French.
China’s postal atlas by the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of China, 1919 (62cm x 38cm), including 29 maps described in 3 languages: Chinese, English and French.
 
 
 
 
China’s postal atlas by the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of China, 1919 (62cm x 38cm), including 29 maps described in 3 languages: Chinese, English and French.
China’s postal atlas by the Ministry of Transport of the Republic of China, 1919 (62cm x 38cm), including 29 maps described in 3 languages: Chinese, English and French.